The Hips of Tradition – 1992 – 1992 – Bros Luaka Bop/Warner

Album Credits

All music arranged and conducted by Tom Zé

Tom Zé: lead vocals
Eder Sandoli: electric guitar, rhythm and lead acoustic guitar, mandolin, bottles and hand claps
Ronaldo de Carvalho: keyboards, vocals and hand claps
Lauro Léllis: drums, cow-bell, hand claps, pandeiro, bottles
Gilberto Assis: bass, hand claps
Jarbas Mariz: Triangle, shaker, reco-reco, hand claps, mandolin and berimbau
All backing vocals by Marle Oliveira, Edy Oliveira, Jarbas Mariz, Ronaldo de Carvalho except Marle and Edy on “Amar”
Additional vocals on “Jingle do Disco” by David Byrne
Additional bottleneck electric and 12-string acoustic guitars on
“Sem a Letra ‘A”‘ by David Byrne
Additional electric guitar on “Tatuarambá” by Arto Lindsay
Additional bass an “Sem a Letra ‘A”‘ and
“Ogodô, Ano 2000” by Greg Cohen
Additional percussion on “Sem a Letra ‘A”‘ and “O Amor é Velho-Menina” by Cyro Baptista
Artistic consultants: Roberto Maia, Charles Furlan, Milton Belmudes

“Cortina 1”, “Cortina 2”, “Cortina 3”,
and “Cortina 4” written by Dougie Bowne,
Arto Lindsay, Cyro Baptista and Tom Zé.
All songs © 1992 Shake Boom! ASCAP except
“Taí” and “Iracema” © Peer International
Corp. BMI
Lyrics Reprinted by Permission.
All Rights Reserved.

Produced by Roberto Lazzarine
Additional production and mixing by Arto Lindsay
Recorded by Leandro Oliveira, Marco Beato Paulo
Grassman and Tom Zé
with assistance by Marco Beato, Roberto Lazzarine and Lauro Léllis
Recorded and mixed at In Sonoris Causa Studios,
São Paulo, Brazil
Additional recording and remixing engineered by
Patrick Dillett at Shelter Island Sound, NYC
Mastered by Scott Hull at Masterdisk
Lyric and liner note translations by Arto Lindsay and Julio Fischer
Project Coordination by Alan Harris
Cover art by Tom Rubnitz (1956-1992)
Photo of Tom Zé: by Janet Atkinson
Photography: Westlight ® / Backgrounds
Drawings courtesy of Redstone Press
Design by Eric Baker Design Associates, Inc.
Executive Producers: David Byrne and Yale Evelev

Special thanks to Valdemar Szaniecki, João Marcos Cicarelli, Fred Rossi, M.M.P. Produçoes S/C Ltda., Hélcio Luiz, José Luis, Dougie Bowne, Cyro Baptista, Greg Cohen, Brenda Dunlap, Sarah Caplan and Melânia, for her spiritual guidance.

Dedicated to Jackson do Pandeiro, backbone of the
Brazillian Northeast

Lyrics

1. Ogodô, Ano 2000 3:57
2. Sem a letra “A” 3:00
3. Feira de Santana 2:53
4. Sofro de Juventude 3:15
5. Cortina 1 1:06 (instrumental)
6. Taí 1:05
7. Iracema 1:44
8. Fliperama 3:04
9. O Amor é Velho-Menina 3:08
10. Cortina 2 0:25 (instrumental)
11. Tatuarambá 2:58
12. Jingle do Disco 1:06
13. Lua-Gira-Sol 2:32
14. Multiplicar-se Única 1:45
15. Cortina 4 0:44 (instrumental)
16. O Pão Nosso de Cada Mês 2:45
17. Amar 3:16

Tom Zé. It´s free association, a merging ofcultures, quirky and exhilarating. Settle in to be unsettled.

SETTLE IN TO BE UNSETTLED

Tom Zé’s original title for this album was Ancas, the Portuguese word for hips. “Hips” is hip here because of the immediate association with movement of the body – dance – even if the music might seem more heady than anything else. But there’s more to this anca business. The word may have come to Portuguese through Provençal, the language of the medieval troubadors who enchanted ladies and admirers with the fine art of song. And what better way to think of Tom Zé than as a (post -) modern troubador of the electronic age, inventing and blending motz el som (words and sound, in Provençal), as the elegant Brazilian concrete poet and critic Augusto de Campos saw some 20 years ago (here the echo is brightest in “Feira de Santana”). In the 1970’s, Tom Zé recorded on a label called Continental, whose beyond – Brazil overtones become even more relevant in listening to this outside urban outbacker who tosses some needed perplexity into the ring of Brazilian music. Zé was a studied poet of song in the 70’s; he experimented with decomposition, groaned satires and pursued “serious” metaphor-laden material. No reason to believe any of that has changed. Here you can hear the against-the-grain “Suffer From Youth,” and sense the surprise without knowing the native language. Tom Zé makes it strange for Brazilians, too. His colorful, oddball, offbeat words simply make you wonder. And even the noise is nice where polyvalent play-polyrhythms, polyphony and polysemic approaches to performance – abounds. These bits and pieces, compositions, songs and soundings probe tradition, diction, arrangement and derangement. 
Settle in to be unsettled, again.

CHARLES A. PERRONE
AUGUST 1992

THOSE WHO THINK …
of Brazilian music as just simple samba from he poor black Rio favelas(slums), or as sophisticated bossa nova, once developed in the rich white neighborhoods of Copacabana and lpanema, are wrong.    It is even more than the contemporary dance craze, lambada,originating from the city of Belém, or the old but ever – popular rhythms and styles of the Northeast, such as forró.
Just listen to the unusual music on this album. It combines experimental melodies and rhythms with concrete poetic verses. It plays with a deep sense of wit, even sarcastic humor – elements mostly unheard of in progressive circles. No wonder. The auteur is Tom Zé, a singer and composer from the Brazilian Northeast, a man still bursting with energy and musical ideas at the age of 55.
As a young, self – educated guitar player, Tom Zé felt that the partly Lusitanian, partly Indian and partly Black cultural heritage in his home state of Bahia was repetitive. All of the rhythms and dances, customs and fests were going around in circles. Nothing evolved, nothing changed. Tom Zé himself recalls, “Although it was a mythical and beautiful time, every year one sang the same songs in the same manner. Every year, one danced the same dances to the same rhythms and steps when the big celebrations came, or when the traditional religious fests were held, like São João or São Pedro.” 
During his high school years in Salvador, Tom Zé was exposed to new musical influences from his communist uncles, who, as most communists do, had a strong interest in records and books. They owned all the records of the piano concerts and symphonies of Tchaikovsky. Tom Zé listened with his uncles to Beethoven and Brahms and opera.
Zé was again confronted with more new musical ideas when he entered the College of Music at the University of Bahia in the late 50’s. Although there were interruptions – he didn’t have much money, coming from a poor family from a little country town upstate – Zé met and studied with teachers who were to influence him profoundly. At this experimental school, classes were held simultaneously in film, theatre, music and poetry.
Some of Tom Zé’s most influential teachers were from Europe. Ernst Widmer, from a small city near Zurich, became his link between European and Brazilian folklore. Widmer was a passionate follower of Igor Stravinsky and Belà Bartók.  Walter Smetak, who was born in Zurich, taught Zé violin, cello and the building of his own instruments, which were sometimes transformed from typewriters, blenders and water conduits. It was these peculiar, experimental instruments which would later become the trademark of Tom Zé’s music.   Hans – Joachim Koellreutter, a native of Freiburg, Germany, and the founder of the open musical seminars at the university, introduced him to the atonal theories of Arnold Schöenberg.
Tom Zé became very interested in atonality, which was always part of the music of the Northeast. Musicians in this region always seem to play sodesafinado – out of tune. Zé also developed a strong interest in the organization of measures, sometimes placing them in a very logical, symmetrical way (such as mirroring them in the middle of the composition), and sometimes in a disorganized, illogical way, depending on how he liked them.
Today, Tom Zé describes his music as a mixture of Schöenberg, Beethoven, and Jackson do Pandeiro. Pandeiro, a true character from the nearby state of Paraíba, has always been one of Zé’s idols. Since youth, Zé has admired him as a magician of rhythms, because he taught people rhythms without them knowing it.  It was these rhythms, Tom Zé believes, that helped people in the Northeast endure their hard life, often having only dry manioc and beans to eat. As Zé stresses, Jackson do Pandeiro provided, in the midst of this unbelievable poverty, a backbone for their spirit.
Tom Zé is also a great admirer of Jackson do Pandeiro’s way of entertaining people, citing his use of funny language, satirical words and ironic verses, and his use of body language to express emotions. To this day, Tom Zé’s performances are stamped by it. One can also detect the influences of the Tropicália movement, to which Zé once belonged. While he was once a creative composing head behind it, that was a long time ago and Tom Zé is always trying to move in new directions.
Tom Zé has lived for many years in the big city of São Paulo, surrounded by concrete, asphalt, skyscrapers, slums and millions of people trying to survive by making a decent living. I personally think this is not so important in context. More importantly for me is how this unusual, exceptional musician is still able to communicate, entertain and address a public with such unusual, exceptional music-  at once avant garde and rooted in tradition.

PETER FIGLESTAHLER
AUGUST 1992

Letras:

Ogodô, Ano 2000 
BY TOM ZÉ (with English lurics by Julio Fischer) 

Ô
ogodô
ogodô ogodô ogodô ogodô
o ogodô
ogodô ogodô ogodô ogodô

Talac-tac-tac-tac tamborim
teleco-teco-teco-teco violão
toloc-toc-toc-toc agogô
Ti-lic-til ano 2000, ano 2000

Talac-tac-tac-tac tamborim
teleco-teco-teco-teco violão
toloc-toc-toc-toc agogô
tô-lôc-tô twenty 00, twenty 00

A ciência excitada
fará o sinal da cruz
e acenderemos fogueiras
para apreciar a lâmpada elétrica.

The science in her trance
will make the sign of cross
and we will light bonfires
to appreciate the electric bulb.

talac-tac…
Ogodõ…

1. Ogodô, Year 2000 
Samba 

Ôôô
Ogodô
ogodô ogodô, ogodô ogodô
ôôô ogodô
ogodô ogodô ogodô ogodô

Talac-tac-tac-tac tamborim
teleco-teco-teco-teco violão
toloc-toc-toc-toc agogô
ti-lic-til ano 2000, ano 2000

Talac-tac-tac-tac tamborim
teleco-teco-teco-teco violão
toloc-toc-toc-toc agogô
tô-lôc-tô twenty 00, twenty 00

A ciência excitada
fará o sinal da cruz
e acenderemos fogueiras
para apreciar a lâmpada elétrica.

The science in her trance
will make the sign of cross
and we will light bonfires
to appreciate the eletric bulb.

talac-tac…
Ogodõ…

(INSPIRED BY A THESIS ON LINGUISTICS BY STANISLAW LEN, “THE INCREDIBLE CONGRESS ON FUTUROLOGY”. – ZÉ)

 
Sem letra “A” 
(Tom Zé and Elifas Andreato) 

Sem você nem tristeza teremos
Pra nos lamentar
Sem você nem morrer de saudade
Nem mesmo chorar
Pois não há chorar

E o amor?
O amor desaparecerá.
E o amor?
Da lembrança ninguém nem se lembrará
E o amor?
Se perder ninguém mais vai no olhar
E o amor?
Palavra vazia ninguém mais namorará
Namorará
Namorara

2. Without the Letter “A” 
(Samba-Leve) 

Without you we won´t even have sadness
To lament.
Without you, no longing till death
Or even weeping
For there is no weeping

And love?
Love will disappear.
And love?
No one will remember to remember.
And love?
If it´s lost, no one will be moved to move by a glance.
And love?
Empty word no one will make
Will make love
Will make love

(FROM A CHILDREN’ S STAGE-PLAY BY ELIFAS ANDREATO, NAMED “SEM VOCÊ NÃO ‘A’ “, IN WHICH THE LETTER “A” RUNS AWAY FROM THE ALPHABET. – ZÉ)

 
Feira de Santana
(by Tom Zé) 

Viajo segunda-feira Feira de Santana.

Quem quiser mandar recado, 
Remeter pacote
Uma carta cativante
Á rua numerada, 
O nome maiusculoso 
pra evitar engano
ou então que o destino
se destrave longe.

Meticuloso, meu prazer não tem medida
teje aqui segunda-feira antes da partida

Viajo segunda-feira Feira de Santana

Trace aqui seu endereço 
sem deixar tropeço
pode seu destinatário 
ter morrido ou simulado, 
pousado ou avoado
nas sentenças do seu fado… 
Eu vou ficar avexado
com uma carta sem dono
le-levando a cuja, 
penando sem ter pousada
batendo de porta em porta 
como uma alma penada.

Viajo segunda-feira
Feira de Santana…

Mas se eu trouxer de volta
o desencontro choroso
da missão desincumprida
devolvo seu envelope 
intacto, certo e fechado
odeio disse-me-disse, 
condeno a bisbilhotice.

Viajo Segunda-feira
Feira de Santana…

Se se der o sucedido
me aguarde aqui no piso,
sete semanas seguidas
a partir do mês em frente
não sou letra reticente
palavra de homem racha 
mas não volta diferente.

 

3. Feira de Santana 
(Samba de Roda) 

Monday I´m heading up to Feira de Santana

Whoever wants to send a note
Or a package
A captivating letter
Street address
The name capitalized
To avoid mistakes
Or that destiny
Should come unshackled at a distance

Meticulous, my pleasure has a measure
Be here Monday before I leave

Monday I´m heading up to Feira de Santana

Inscribe your own address
Without a stumble
Perhaps your intended recipient
Has died or simulated death
Retired or flown
On the phrasingof or fado
And I´ll be irritad
By a letter with no owner
Carriyng the aforesaid, pining with no place to rest
Knocking from door to door
Like a soul in penance

Monday I´m heading up to Feira de Santana


But if I bring back
That sorrowful misconnection
Of an unfilled mission
I´ll return your envelope
Intact, corrected and closed
I hate “I said, your saids”
and condemn all idle chatter

Monday I´m heading up to Feira de Santana


If that should come to pass
Wait for me here on the kitchen tiles
Seven weeks counting
From the month to come
I´m not written in disappearing ink
A man´s word may break
but it remains unchanged.

(THIS SONG TAKES ME BACK TO THE WORLD OF WILLIAM FAULKNER AND GUIMARAES ROSA. – ZÉ)

 
Sofro de Juventude
(Lyrics by Tom Zé Music by Eder Sandoli) 

Eu sofro de juventude
essa coisa maldita,
que quando tá quase pronta
desmorona e se frita.

Negar a boca do pai
para eu mesmo descobrir
desesperar-me de medo
perante cada segredo.

O meu pai, o diretor 
e o doutor juiz, 
juiz, juiz
me jogaram neste poço
e onde eu ouço 
ouço ouço ouço

Em doçuras e torturas 
em pleno gozo 
gozo 
O urubu que no seu pouso 
me prepara e me separa 
do caroço 
osso osso osso

E me veste 
com a peste 
para a festa do colosso 
Do colosso, do colosso, ô, ô.

4. Suffer From Youth 
(Baião Quebrado) 

I suffer from youth.
That danned thing.
when it´s almost ready,
It falls apart and fries.

Deny the mouth of the Father
To discover for myself,
despair of myself in fear
Before every secret.

Oh my Father, the director and the honorable judge
Judge, judge, judge.
Threw me in the ditch
Where I hear:
I hear, I hear, I hear

in sweet pleasures and in torture
In full orgasm,

That buzzard, that alighting
Prepares me, Separates me
From the seed:
Bone bone bone

And cloak myself
In the plague
For the feast of the colossus.

(I WROTE THIS SONG WHILE LISTENING TO THE SONGS OF THE YOUNG ROCK COMPOSERS OF BRAZIL. – ZÉ)

 
Cortina 1

(Instrumental)

 

 
 
Taí
(By Joubert de Carvalho) 

Taí, eu fiz tudo pra você gostar de mim
ai, meu bem, não faz assim comigo não.

Você tem, você tem 
que me dar seu coração.

Essa história de gostar de alguém
já é mania que as pessoas têm
se me ajudasse nosso senhor
eu não pensaria mais no amor.

Taí…

6. There It Is 
(Baião-Marcha de Carnaval) 

There it is, I did everything to make you like me
Ai, my dear, don´t do me this way, don´t
You´ve got, you´ve got to give me your heart.

This tale of falling for someone
Is some mania that people have
If our Lord would help me
I would no longer think of love.

There it is

(MY INTERPRETATION WAS INSPIRED BY THE DIFFICULTY OF DAILY LIFE IN SÃO PAULO. – ZÉ)

Iracema
(by Adoniran Barbosa ) 

Iracema, eu sempre dizia:
cuidado  ao travessar essas ruas.
eu falava mas você não me escutava não.
Iracema, você travessou contra-mão.

7. Iracema
(Samba-Novela) 

Iracema, I always said
Be careful when you cross the street
I told you, but you didn´t listen
Iracema, you crossed against traffic.

Fliperama
(by Tom Zé ) 

Flip, flip, flip
Filip, flip, filip, filip, flip
Flipé – pépé – pépé – pépé

Rará – rará – rará – rará
Rará – rará – rará – rá
Râ – mamá – mâma – mamá – mamá
Fliperama

O louco comandante Flip 
com a sua moedinha
quer fazer uma guerra na Terra

Oferece um caminhão e o seu cinturão
Que para a batalha não falha.
E no quarto faz com ela
A terceira arruela 
Do amor que tem a violência,
Com o pirulito da ciência – á – á – á 
Com o pirulito da ciência – á – á
Pelo pirulito da ciência – â – â 
Pelo pirulito da ciência – â
Apelo

 

8. Fliperama
(Baião Quebrado ) 

Flip, the crazy commander
With his little coin
Wants to make war On earth.

He offers a truck, and his belt
That never fails in battle,
And in his roon tightens with her
The third washer
Of love, the violent one.
With the lollipop of science ááá
With the lollipop of science ááá
For the lollipop of science áá
For the lollipop of science
I beseech

(THE CLANDESTINE SOLITUDE IN CHILDHOOD´S END BY ARTHUR CLARKE.. – ZÉ)

O Amor é Velho-Menina
(by Tom Zé ) 

O amor é velho, velho, velho  
e menina.
O amor é trilha 
de lençóis e culpa
medo e maravilha.

O tempo a vida lida
andam pelo chão,
o amor aeroplanos
O amor zomba dos anos,
o amor anda nos tangos,
no rastro dos ciganos,
no vão dos oceanos.

O amor é poço 
onde se despejam
lixo e brilhantes:
orações, sacrifícios, traições.

 

9. Love Is An Old Little Girl
(Canção ) 

Love is old old old
And a little girl.
Love is a trail
Of sheets and blame,
Fear and the marvelous

Time, life, the reading of it,
Walk along the ground.
Love, airplanes
Love mocks the years.
Love walksamong tangos
Along the gypsy trail.
In the ocean´s vault,

Love is a well
Where trash and precious stones are tossed.
Prayers, sacrifices, betrayals.

 

Cortina 2

(Instrumental)

 

 
Tatuarambá
(by Tom Zé  – with English lyrics by Julio Fischer) 

Descobrir as ancas da tradições
para o ferro em brasa dos anúncios, oi, ai, oi

To expose the hips of the tradition
To the burning iron of ads.

Êêêê, Tatuarambá
Ôôôô, pelar o corpo para no samba-ba-bá.
Êêêê, sujar o corpo de samba,
Segura o rabo do samba, Taí, pintou, Eôôôô.

Tuá, tuá uaru, guba, gudu gubagudê tuá.

Êêêê, trazer o corpo para os pincéis da eletrônica, ôôô
Tatuarambá
Ôôôô, vestir o poema-anúncio, ô
Pelar o corpo no samba-ba-bá.

Êêêê, trazer o corpo para a tatuagem
Sujar o rabo do samba
Segura o rabo do samba, taí, pintou, ô!

Êêêê, para a tatuagem das antenas, das antenas.

Corpo não é pecado,
Corpo não é proibido,
Corpo não é mentira
Flesh isn´t lie
Flesh isn´t sin
Flesh isn´t forbiden, oi, oi, oi, ô ô forbiden

Êêêê, trazer o corpo para os pincéis… etc.

Melar o corpo no “meu limão, meu limoeiro”
Lamber o corpo no “meu pé de jacarandá”
Corpo não é mentira, corpo não é proibido
Corpo não é pecado.

Tatuarambá

Descobrir as ancas das tradições
Para o ferro em brasa dos anúncios.
To expose the hips of the tradition
To the burning iron of ads.
Fazendo cócegas nas tradições
Itching, scrathing the tradition.

11. Tatuarambá
(Samba ) 

To expose the hips of tradition
To the burning iron of ads

É Tatuarambá
Ô, Ô, Ô, Ô Make naked the body in samba bá ba
Ê, Ê, Ê, Ê To defile the body in samba
Hold the Samba´s ass, that´s it, it´s shown up, Ê, ô, ô, ô, ô

Ê, Ê, Ê, Ê bring the body to the brushes
of eletronics, ô, ô, ô
Tatuarambá

Ô, Ô, Ô, Ô to wear the poem-commercial
Make naked the body in samba

Ê, Ê, Ê,Ê bring the body to be tattooed
Defile the ass of samba
Hold the samba´s ass, that´s it, it´s shows up, ô!
Êôôôô for the tattooing of the antennas, the antennas

Flesh isn´t sin
Flesh isn´t forbidden
Flesh is no lie

 

Ê, lead the body to the brushes

Smear the body to “round and round the mulberry bush”
Lick the body on “we all fall down”
Flesh is no lie
Flesh isn´t frobidden
Flesh isn´t sin
To expose the hips of tradition
To the burning iron of ads

Tickling traditions
Itching, scratching the tradition

(INSPIRED BY “THE PROVISIONAL CHARACTER OF THE AESTHETIC”, BY HAROLDO DE CAMPOS, IN A ARTE NO HORIZONTE DO PROVÁVEL . – ZÉ)

Jingle do Disco
(by Tom Zé  – with English lyrics by Julio Fischer) 

Comprem este disco
É uma pesquisa paciente.
Tom Zé! Tom Zé!
Cada volta da agulha 
Pelo sulco docemente
Tom Zé! Tom Zé!
Fará você ficar 
Mais feliz e inteligente
Tom Zé! Tom Zé!

12. Jingle Of The Record
(Samba ) 

Come on, buy this record.
It´s a very patient work;
Tom Zé! Tom Zé!
Every calm revolution
under a laser, hissless,
Tom Zé, Tom Zé
Shall grant you relaxation,
high spirits and happiness!
Tom Zé

(INSPIRED BY THOMAS EDISON´S NOTORIOUS ABILITY TO SELL HIS IDEAS. – ZÉ)

Lua-Gira-Sol
(byTom Zé ) 

Lua uva
lua nova
lua noiva, ô, luar.

Lua seda
me arpeja
Me palmeja, ô, luar.

Ô gira-sol, gira luar
gira, gira, gira-sol, gira luar
girou.
Gira, gira, gira-sol, gira luar
gira, gira, gira-sol, gira luar
girou.

13. Moon-Turn-Flower
(Canção ) 

Grape moon
New moon
Bride moom, oh moonlight

Silk moom
Arpeggiate me
Palm, oh moonlight

Oh sunflower, whirl moonlight
Oh sunflower, whirl moonlight
Oh sunflower, whirl moonlight
turn turn sunflower, turn moonlight
Turn

(IN THE FIRST FEW PAGES OF JOSEPH AND HIS BROTHERS, BY THOMAS MANN, JACOB FINDS JOSEPH WORSHIPPING THE MOON. – ZÉ)

Multiplicar-se Única
(byTom Zé ) 

Toda a canção quer se multiplicar
na multidão única se tornar.

Simples prazer
de ressoar
no ar
o som da voz.
Canta por nós:
cordas vocais
sem cais,
cordas ou nós.

14. Multiply Into One
(Samba ) 

Every song wants to multiply
In the multitude become one

Simple pleasure
Of resounding
In air
Sound of a voice
Sing for us
Vocal chords
Without home port
Bonds or knots

(INSPIRED BY THE MODERN MATHEMATICS OF CANTOR AND THE PARADOXES OF CERVANTE’S DON QUIXOTE.  – ZÉ )

Cortina 4

(Instrumental)

 
O Pão Nosso de Cada Mês
(by Tom Zé ) 

Turug – tug,  passarei
turug – tug, esta década
turug – tug , num chiqueirinho bem burguês.
Turug – tug, comendo
turug – tug, minha culturinha 
de massa todo mês.

Ô ô sentado no sofá da sala.

Nos janeiros comerei Ano-Novo
nos fevereiros comerei carnavais
e nos marços comerei 
presentes de sogra, ô, nenê.

Õ ô sentado no sofá da sala

No abril é o presente da Páscoa
e nos maios comerei presentes das mães
e nos junhos comerei
presentes dos namorados, ô, nenê.

Ô ô sentado no sofá da sala … …

16. Our Monthly Bread
(Samba ) 

Turug – tug – I´ll pass
Turug – tug – this decade
Turug – tug – in a very bourgeois hen house
Turug – tug – eating
Turug – tug – my monthly portion of mass culture

Oh oh sitting on the living room sofa

In Januaries, I´ll eat New Years
In Februaries, I´ll eat Carnivals
And in Marches, I´ll eat a mother-in-law´s presents, oh baby,

Oh oh sitting on the living room sofa

In April, it´s an Easter present
And in Mays, I´ll eat a present for mothers
And in junes, I´ll eat the lover´s presents, oh baby.

Oh oh sitting on living room sofa…

(I HAD A PLEASANT EXPERIENCE WHEN I WORKED AT AN AGENCY; IT WAS A CREATIVE AND EXCITING ATMOSPHERE. – ZÉ)

Amar
(|by Tom Zé ) 

Amar, amar
ceder ao coração
a razão
e só, só, só viver 
pra ser
a casca pro outro
viver.

E ter, e ter e ter
amarguras mil sem ter,
por que e pra que tecer
e ser
como uma varinha de condão
para quando riscar o chão 
espalhar, espalhar no céu (ah!)
Beatles a granel
em sonhos de papel
porque na vida amar é fel
e mel

Tudo bem alto,
Tudo baixinho,
Tudo calado
Tudo bem alto,
Tudo baixinho
Tudo…

 

17. To Love
(Canção ) 

To love, to love
Allow the heart
To reason
to only, to only, to only, to live only
To be
Skin to the other


And have and have and have
Bitterness immeasurable without having
A reason why nor a reason for weaving
And be
Like a little wand
That, scratching the earth,
Scatters, scatters in the sky
Beatles by the bushel
in paper dreams
Because in life love is bile
and honey

All up so high
All down so low
All so quiet
All up so high
All down so low
All…

(INSPIRED BY THE LOVE OF DIDO FOR ENEAS, AFTER THE TROJAN WAR. WEELL SIMON SCHAMA IS A SKILLFUL HISTORIAN; I JUST WROTE A SONG.  – ZÉ )